Author Topic: Phil Dragoo Commentaries and Images  (Read 80282 times)

Alan Dale

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Re: Phil Dragoo Commentaries and Images
« Reply #45 on: July 11, 2013, 01:57:13 PM »
The Assassination / Where did the bullet go

Douglas Horne, Inside the Assassinations Record Review Board, Volume II, Chapter Five: The Autopsy X-Rays, pages 530-2:

Custer Examines the X-Rays of the Body

The noteworthy highlights of Custer's review of the x-rays of the body was Jeremy's attempt to see whether Custer could identify metal fragments near any of the cervical vertebrae, which Custer had mentioned earlier in the deposition.

Jeremy showed Custer x-ray no. 9, a view of the chest prior to removal of the lungs, and the  exchange went as follows:

Gunn:  Previously, you referred to there being metal fragments in the cervical area.  Are you able to identify any metal fragments in this x-ray?

Custer:  Not in this film.

Gunn:  Does this film include a view or an exposure that would have included such metal fragments?

Custer:  No sir.

Gunn:  Where would the metal fragments be located?

Custer:  Further up in there.  This region.

Gunn:  Can you—and you're pointing to?

Custer:  Up into the, I'd say, C3/C4 region.

Jeremy asked Custer to review x-rays no. 8 and 10, of the right shoulder and chest, and left shoulder and chest, respectively—both are images following the removal of the heart and lungs. Custer could not identify metal fragments in either x-ray.

Later, Jeremy asked Custer the following questions:

Gunn:  Now, you had raised, previously in the deposition. . .the possibility of some metal fragments in the C3/C4 range.

Custer:  I noticed I didn't see that.

Gunn:  You didn't see any x-rays that would be in—that would include the C3/C4 area?

Custer:  No sir.

Gunn:  Are you certain that you took x-rays that included the—included C3 and C4?

Custer:  Yes, sir.  Absolutely.

Gunn:  How many x-rays did you take that would have included that?

Custer:  Just one.  And that was all that was necessary, because it showed—right there.

Gunn:  And what, as best you recall,  did it show?

Custer:  A fragmentation of a shell in and around that circular exit—that area.  Let me rephrase that.  I don't want to say “exit,”  because I don't know whether it was exit or entrance.  But all I can say, there was bullet fragmentations [sic] around that area—that opening.

Gunn:  Around C3/C4?

Custer:  Right.

Gunn”  And do you recall how many fragments there were?

Custer:  Not really.  There was enough.  It was very prevalent.

Gunn:  Did anyone make any observations about metal fragments in the C3/C4 area?

Custer:  I did.  And I was told to mind my own business.  That's where I was shut down again.

Gunn:  You have, during the course of this deposition, identified three x-rays that you are quite certain that you took, but don't appear in this collection.  Are there any others that you can identify as not being included?

Custer:  That's the only three that come to my mind right now; the two tangential views, and the A-P cervical spine.

Gunn:  Okay.

Custer:  Can I add something to that?

Gunn:  Sure.

Custer:  In my own opinion, I do believe, basically, the reason why they are not here is because they showed massive amounts of bullet fragments.
Our future may lie beyond our vision, but it is not completely beyond our control. It is the shaping impulse of America that neither fate nor nature nor the irresistible tides of history, but the work of our own hands, matched to reason and principle, that will determine our destiny.

RFK

Alan Dale

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Re: Phil Dragoo Commentaries and Images
« Reply #46 on: July 11, 2013, 01:59:23 PM »
The Assassination / Cold chills all over--but no thrill up the back of my leg

MR . BALL: Now when you went into the room you looked these people over, these four men?

MRS. MARKHAM: Yes, sir.

MR. BALL: Did you recognize anyone in the line-up?

MRS. MARKHAM: No, sir.

MR BALL: You did not? Did you see anybody- I have asked you that question before -did you recognize anybody from their face?

MRS. MARKHAM: From their face, no.

MR. HALL: Did you identify anybody in these four people?

MRS. MARKHAM: I didn't know nobody.

MR . BALL: I know you didn't know anybody, but did anybody in that lineup look like anybody you had seen before?

MRS. MARKHAM: No. I had never seen none of them before.

MR. BALL: No one of the four?

MRS. MARKHAM: No one of them.

MR . BALL: No one of all four?

MRS. MARKHAM: No, sir.

Ultimately, out of desperation the Commission's attorney had to resort to putting a leading question to his own witness absolutely inadmissible in any real court in order to telegraph to the witness what he wanted to hear:

MR. BALL: You recognized him from his appearance?

MRS. MARKHAM: I asked-I looked at him. When I saw this man I wasn't sure, but I had cold chills just run over me.




http://scribblguy.50megs.com/tippit.htm

Markham: I had cold chills just run over me.

Just imagine what Clint Eastwood as Rowdy Yates would've done.

Such is the state of the “evidence”--the hysterical woman who dropped to her knees and covered her eyes, who talked with the dead police officer, who had cold chills run all over her after much prodding from the prosecution—why, it's George Tenet's “slam-dunk” all over again.
Our future may lie beyond our vision, but it is not completely beyond our control. It is the shaping impulse of America that neither fate nor nature nor the irresistible tides of history, but the work of our own hands, matched to reason and principle, that will determine our destiny.

RFK

Alan Dale

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Re: Phil Dragoo Commentaries and Images
« Reply #47 on: July 11, 2013, 02:00:07 PM »
The Assassination / Just one more thing; Columbo still curious

Steve Duffy

Your reference to Collins Radio reminded me of John Armstrong's account in Harvey, Lee & Tippit: A New Look at the Tippit Shooting:


http://www.ctka.net/pr198-jfk.html

Collins Radio and the CIA

Shortly after 2:00 PM, Mr. T. F. White observed a man sitting in a 1961 red Ford Falcon, with the engine running, in the El Chico parking lot behind his garage. This is five blocks north of the Texas Theater. As Mr. White approached the car, the driver turned and looked at him. The driver then sped off in a westerly direction on Davis Street. Mr. White, who later saw Oswald's picture on TV, said the man in the Falcon was identical to Oswald and wore a "white T-shirt." When told by the FBI that Oswald was in jail at 2:00 PM, White still maintained that the man he saw driving the red Falcon was "possibly identical" to the Oswald he had seen on TV after the assassination. This Oswald "sighting" shortly after Harvey Oswald's arrest at the Texas Theater could have been a case of mistaken identity. But Mr. White, who had been given police training, wrote down the vehicle's license plate number. The plates belonged to a blue 1957 Plymouth 4 door sedan-not a 1961 red Ford Falcon. The Plymouth belonged to Carl Mather, a long time employee of Collins Radio and close friend of J.D. Tippit. Newsman and former Dallas Mayor Wes Wise heard of the unusual Oswald sighting. Mr. Wise and fellow news reporter Jane Bartell questioned Mather about the incident over dinner. Mather was so nervous he could hardly talk and said little. In 1977 the HSCA wanted to interview Mather about this incident. He agreed, but not before he was granted immunity from prosecution by the Justice Department. Mather was interviewed by the HSCA, but most of the documents relating to that interview remain classified in the National Archives. Why?

One possible reason is Oswald's prior connection to Collins Radio and what Collins Radio actually represented. Oswald, in the company of George De Mohrenschildt, had once visited the home of retired Admiral Henry Bruton, who was an executive of Collins Radio. This was reported by the HSCA in a manuscript called "I'm A Patsy" by De Mohrenschildt. Bruton and his position with Collins is also mentioned in Edward Epstein's book Legend. Bruton had been a lawyer in Virginia before becoming a Navy intelligence officer. Bruton's specialty was electronic surveillance and this is what he was bringing to Collins Radio. In April of 1963, the Wall Street Journal announced that Collins would construct a modern radio communications system linking Laos, Thailand, and South Vietnam. On November 1, 1963, the New York Times reported that Fidel Castro had captured a large boat called the Rex which was being leased to Collins Radio at the time. The next day, one of the captured Cuban exiles aboard the Rex confessed that the boat had been used to ferry arms into Cuba and that "the CIA organized all arms shipments" (New York Times 11/3/63). According to Bill Kelly (Back Channels, Summer 1992), the Rex was the flagship of the JM/WAVE fleet, the CIA's super station in Miami. According to Kelly, Castro announced that the arms shipments were meant for an assassination attempt on top Cuban leaders. What a provocative scenario: five blocks from where Oswald was arrested we have an Oswald double in a car traced to Tippit's friend and the friend works for a CIA associated company that plays a role in the plots against Cuba and Castro.

Meanwhile, Harvey Oswald was sitting in the police station, accused of crimes he did not commit. When questioned by the Dallas Police, he said he had walked out the front of the TSBD, boarded a bus, taken a cab to North Beckley, and then gone to a movie. Harvey Oswald's statements to the Dallas Police follow and agree with witness identification of the man wearing the "brown shirt." He maintained his innocence and described himself as a "patsy" but to no avail. The Dallas Police charged him, one "Lee Harvey Oswald," with murder. Sheriff Bill Decker provided the Warren Commission (12H51) a file titled "Harvey Lee Oswald, W M 24, murder.....11/22/63 of John Fitzgerald Kennedy." At least the Sheriff's department got his name right.
~

Tippit's behavior that morning indicated he was desperately waiting for someone to cross the bridge from Dallas.  Was Tippit Desperately Seeking Lee:

http://www.acorn.net/jfkplace/03/JA/DR/.DR1/.Orig/.dr33.txt

Five witnesses saw Officer J. D. Tippit arrive at the Gloco service station at
12:45 pm. He sat in his car and watched traffic cross the bridge from Dallas
for about ten minutes. There had been no police dispatches ordering Tippit to
this location. William Whaley's cab with Oswald inside crossed the Houston
Viaduct at about 12:52 pm, passing in front of the Gloco Station. At about this
same time, Tippit pulled out from the station and sped south on Lancaster. At
12:54, Tippit answered a call from his dispatcher and said he was at "8th and
Lancaster," a mile south of the Gloco Station.


He turned right on Jefferson Blvd., and stopped again at the Top Ten Record
Store a few minutes before 1:00 pm. According to store clerk Louis Cortinas and
owner W. R. "Dub" Stark, Tippit parked his patrol car on Bishop Street, ran
into the store, dialed a number on their pay phone, and hung up, apparently not
getting an answer. Police dispatcher Murray Jackson called Tippit at 1:03 pm
and got no answer.


Tippit returned to his car, and sped across Jefferson, then down Bishop Street
to Sunset, where he ran a stop sign and turned right. From this intersection,
he was about two minutes away from Oswald's rooming house at 1026 North
Beckley.


William Whaley left Oswald off near the corner of Neely Street and North
Beckley a few minutes before 1:00 pm. Oswald walked three and a half blocks
north to his rooming house. Housekeeper Earlene Roberts had been watching
television coverage of the assassination, which had begun at 12:58 pm. Oswald
arrived shortly thereafter, and spent "three or four minutes" in his room,
where he supposedly changed clothes and picked up a .38 revolver. (6 H 439-42)
Later in the day the Dallas police would send some men out to search the
premises. They would ask if a "Harvey Lee Oswald" lived there. (6 H 438)


While Oswald was in his room, a Dallas patrol car drove by slowly, stopped
briefly in front of 1026 North Beckley, honked its horn twice, then drove on.
Mrs. Roberts turned to look out the front door, thinking it was a policeman
friend of hers, but quickly realized it wasn't, and turned back to the
television. (6 H 443) When asked by the Warren Commission if she'd noticed the
squad car's number, she said that she hadn't, but that possibly it was 106 or
107. (6 H 443-44) J. D. Tippit's car was number 10. All other police cars were
accounted for at that time; none but Tippit's was supposed to be in Oak Cliff.
If this was not Tippit, who was it? As far as the record shows, the Commission
never sought to find out.

~

The hysterical witness with her hands over her eyes who spoke with the dead officer positively identified Oswald after leading questioning because she felt a chill come over her.

Then there's Lee's incredible speed on foot, his ability to fire automatic shells through a revolver with a bent firing pin, and to change shape—even become two men—and drive off in a grey Plymouth.

In a court of law the defense attorney would successfully exclude the flawed inculpatory evidence—hence the accused would be murdered while in custody of tens of armed Dallas police before the national media by a man whose FBI and gunrunning and outfit links would not be pursued.

What's to see?  Oswald killed Tippit because he killed Kennedy and fired at Walker.

Oswald killed Kennedy because he killed Tippit and fired at Walker.

And he fired at Walker with a bullet that changed shape after the act—and he drove away from the Walker scene as two men.

Same modus operandi—pure Oswald, the Communist.
Our future may lie beyond our vision, but it is not completely beyond our control. It is the shaping impulse of America that neither fate nor nature nor the irresistible tides of history, but the work of our own hands, matched to reason and principle, that will determine our destiny.

RFK

Alan Dale

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Re: Phil Dragoo Commentaries and Images
« Reply #48 on: July 11, 2013, 02:00:54 PM »
The Assassination / Wanted for Treason

And the patsy was created from the fabric of the evil of the times, Communism.  The Legend of Lee Harvey Oswald, who enlisted in 1956 and was marked by Hemming at Atsugi as a penetration agent.  Part of the false defector program.  Meeting Marina as others had done.

Sent over through Albert Schweitzer College set up by Allen Dulles' patient manipulation of Unitarians for decades.  Retrieved and routed through J. Walton Moore of CIA Domestic Contacts Division, and Ruth Paine whose sister was a CIA agent, whose family had links to Dulles, and was deeply involved in the Bell Helicopter.

Bundy cancelled the final B-25 raid on Castro's three T-33 jets with their .50 cal. Machine guns which would chop up the brigade and put the words “damned traitor” on the mouths of hundreds of angry men trained for military action.

Concurrently the late namesakes of the very alive James Jesus Angleton/William King Harvey were networking with John Rosselli, Santos Trafficante, Carlos Marcello, Sam Giancana, ostensibly to hit Fidel—but can we see any serious intent.  Because the security state needs that boogey man.

Kennedy the peacenik and the word we do not use, Kennedy who would not strike when General Jack Hammer demanded it, when Slim Pickens ached to ride the ICBM to Moscow, the cruel month of October, marked as the falling leaves.

June of 1963 the one Dulles mocked saying “he thought he was a god” struck at the Federal Reserve with Executive Order 11110 June 4, and a peace speech with the Commies June 10.

And in October, the cruel month, National Security Action Memorandum 263 running from the fight as the French had done and counseled, spoiling the profits of Brown & Root et al, cutting off access to the Golden Triangle's drugs.

From mobsters to oilmen, from racists to hawks, on every side enemies, and they would be used either as facilitators or false sponsors by the likes of Helms and Angleton and Harvey, those brass knuckles of the Rockefeller-class of power elite, and of a supranational cabal of bankers and industrialists.

Consider:  Dulles was in Zurich when the Germans put Lenin on a train for Petrograd to destabilize Russia and remove it from the fight, ease pressure on the Dulles brothers' clients in Germany.

Kennedy was replaced by the hawk Johnson and the following year the too-soft Khrushchev was replaced by the hawk Brezhnev.

War and chaos, drugs and crime, all flourish.  Everybody happy in this best of all possible worlds.

Karzai is silenced and Petraeus leaves the field for Langley.  The decisions are not made by the temporary residents of the Oval Office.

The last time it was tried the office was recarpeted blood red.

“IT’S OVER”
November 22, 1963

A memorandum dictated by Moynihan to himself, describing his chaotic, terrible day after news of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy reached Washington. William Walton was an artist and Kennedy-family friend. Charles Horsky was a prominent lawyer and White House adviser on national capital affairs. Moynihan at the time was an assistant secretary of labor in the Kennedy administration.
Bill Walton, Charlie Horsky and I were just finishing lunch at Walton’s house—in the grandest good mood with Walton leaving for the Russian tour that afternoon—I was talking about Brasilia and the phone rang. Oh no! Killed! No! Horsky’s office had phoned for him to return. We rushed upstairs. Television had some of it but the commercials continued. Bill began sobbing. Out of control. Horsky in a rage. Clint (?)Jackie’s agent had said the President is dead. Walton knew this meant it was so. He dressed more or less and we went directly to the White House from Georgetown. On the way the radio reported that Albert Thomas had said he might be living.
We went directly to the President’s office which was torn apart with new carpets being put down in his office and the cabinet room. As if a new President were to take office. No one about save Chuck Daly. McGeorge Bundy appeared. Icy. Ralph Dungan came in smoking a pipe, quizzical, as if unconcerned. Then Sorensen. The three together in the door of the hallway that leads to the Cabinet room area. Dead silent. Someone said “It’s over.”
http://www.vanityfair.com/politics/features/2010/11/moynihan-letters-201011

Our future may lie beyond our vision, but it is not completely beyond our control. It is the shaping impulse of America that neither fate nor nature nor the irresistible tides of history, but the work of our own hands, matched to reason and principle, that will determine our destiny.

RFK

Alan Dale

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Re: Phil Dragoo Commentaries and Images
« Reply #49 on: July 11, 2013, 02:01:36 PM »
The Assassination / DOA Methodist Hospital 1:15 PM

Our future may lie beyond our vision, but it is not completely beyond our control. It is the shaping impulse of America that neither fate nor nature nor the irresistible tides of history, but the work of our own hands, matched to reason and principle, that will determine our destiny.

RFK

Alan Dale

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Re: Phil Dragoo Commentaries and Images
« Reply #50 on: July 11, 2013, 02:02:19 PM »
The Assassination / Bag photographed--but not in place

The contrived lineup identification to the contrary notwithstanding and the revised Givens 2.0 testimony, Oswald was firing nothing more lethal than a glass bottle of classic Coca Cola.

The Dallas Police paraffin test of his cheek was confirmed by the NAA testing of the Atomic Energy Commission Oak Ridge Lab as negative.  A test sensitive to a few parts in a billion was exculpatory of the defendant and destructive of the a priori LBJ-Hoover-Commission frame-up.

The witnesses saw at least one man running from the back door of the building, while the elevators and stairways provided a means of escape for anyone who wished.

http://www.reopenkennedycase.net/gilbride.html


In addition to the Mauser and the Mannlicher-Carcano, an Enfield .303 was mentioned in contemporary accounts.

Speaking of the fire escape, an officer with a long gun may or may not be carrying a shotgun.

Many pigeons scattered; the only one caught was prey made of clay.

And who discovered one of the various bags without indentation or oil stain whose materials could be tested to match a batch in use at a time after the assassination.  Where is that photograph in situ.

And that bag, that amazing shape-shifting invisible bag.  It warrants the thorough examination by Jim DiEugenio referencing the work of Pat Speer and others to determine its provenance:

From Part Six Section II of Jim DiEugenio's review of Bugliosi

http://www.ctka.net/2008/bugliosi_6_review.html


 
So there follows in the Warren Report a sentence that has become enshrined in assassination literature since 1964, by both critics and Commission defenders alike—neither side questioning it. It goes like this: "Oswald told Frazier that he would like to drive to Irving to pick up some curtain rods for an apartment in Dallas." (ibid)

As written, this statement is not accurate. Oswald did not admit to saying this. It originates with Frazier. And the other detail that goes with it, namely that he said he carried those curtain rods in a long paper bag to work on Friday, is also not accurate. Oswald did not say that either. Will Fritz wrote a report after Oswald was killed in which he said that when he confronted Oswald with Frazier's story about the curtain rods, the suspect denied it. (WR p. 604) Oswald maintained that he carried a lunch bag to work on Friday. (Sylvia Meagher, Accessories After the Fact, p. 225) Yet this long paper bag story was injected into the press so quickly and forcefully that even as able a critic as Sylvia Meagher accepted it. Her and Mark Lane did not argue about who was telling the truth, Frazier or Oswald. Instead they argued over how long the bag was. This story about the long paper bag had to wait for decades to be seriously challenged. But challenged it is.

The first problem with it is this: Jack Dougherty saw Oswald as he entered the building that morning after he left Frazier's car. He was specifically asked about the long bag, he didn't recall it. (WC Vol. VI, p. 377) No one else saw it either. (Meagher, p. 58) This is a package that the Commission says was three feet long. (Harold Weisberg, Whitewash, p. 58) One way to have tested Oswald's lunch bag story was to have interviewed the driver of the catering truck that visited the work site each morning. There is no evidence that this was done.(Meagher, p. 225) This is an important point because Frazier said that Oswald always carried his lunch except for that day. (WR p. 133) So if Oswald did not buy his lunch that day, then what was he eating on the first floor? Also, there is no affirmative evidence from the Paine household that Oswald picked up any curtain rods. Ruth Paine, who helped incriminate Oswald every way she could, said he took no rods from their household. ( Vol. IX, p. 424) Marina Oswald said the same. (WC Vol. 22 p. 751) No witness saw Oswald transport the paper bag to the Paine household, or is on record as seeing the long paper bag at the Paines. (Weisberg, pgs. 51, 52, 59)

Depository witness Troy West is interesting in this regard. As Harold Weisberg notes, the Commission states that this long paper bag was made from paper and tape secured from the Depository. (Weisberg, p. 58) West had worked at the place for 16 years. He said he never left his station, even for lunch. He was the man in charge of dispensing the paper and tape for packaging. When asked if Oswald ever approached his desk for paper or tape he said he did not. (Vol. VI p. 360) Further, West established that the tape would automatically be dispensed from the machine while wet. To take it out dry, you would literally have to take the tape out of the machine first. (ibid p. 361) Which neither West, nor anybody else, saw Oswald do.

Further, the FBI reported that the rifle in evidence was well-oiled. Yet the bag had no oil stains on it. (Ian Griggs, No Case to Answer, p. 203) British Det. Griggs has also done experiments in disassembling the Mannlicher Carcano. It turns out that the Commission and the FBI were deceptive in this. When actually disassembled, the rifle has to be broken down into 12 parts to isolate the wooden stock. Unless the smaller parts are placed in an envelope, they will bounce around in the package and make noise. Which Frazier did not report hearing. Finally, when this is done, and Griggs did it, the stock is inevitably scratched by the metal parts. Yet this scratching is not seen on the rifle in evidence today. (Griggs, p. 200)

Let's add this up. Oswald never approached Troy West to secure the paper or tape the Commission says he used to prepare the package. If he had, he would have needed to tape the package in front of West. Which West would have surely remembered. Yet, in spite of that fact, no one saw Oswald carry the package with him to the Paines. (Meagher, pgs. 48-49)Not even Frazier. (Think about all that for a few seconds.) Further, no one at the Paines' residence recalls the package, or Oswald asking for curtain rods. Once Oswald left Frazier's car, no one saw him carrying a long bulky package inside the building. So besides Frazier—I will get to Linnie Mae Randle's testimony later—how did the Commission link Oswald to the bag?

Through a right palmprint and the left fingerprint of his index finger. (WR p. 135) Think how absurd this is. In all the necessary handiwork of securing the paper, preparing this three foot package, taping it together, putting the rifle inside, carrying it into the building, and finally taking it out of the package—Oswald got one single fingerprint on it. Further, there were no other prints on the bag. How could that be if, as we shall see, the police told the Commission that two of them—possibly three of them—picked it up and delivered it to HQ?

What makes this print evidence even more questionable is that there are two differing documents on the FBI analysis of the paper. Way back in 1977 Gary Shaw discovered two FBI documents. They said two nearly opposite things about the same exhibit. One document said that paper samples from the Depository were "not identical" with the bag in evidence. The other said the samples had the same observable characteristics as the bag in evidence. This indicated that the Bureau realized that the bag created a problem for them and that the Dallas Police were wrong about where the paper came from. They therefore changed the first document with precise language to the second one with the vague language to give themselves legal leeway. Because if they admitted the paper did not come from the Depository, then where did it come from? Shaw, and researchers Jack White and Ed Tatro, believed the Bureau altered a document in order to frame Oswald.

As Pat Speer notes, Bugliosi deals with this issue in his End Notes. Bugliosi says that since the reports were from different days, it is obvious that further investigation by Hoover of later paper samples straightened it all out. Speer comments that there is a big problem with Bugliosi's solution: Both reports were created on the same day, 11/30/63. And since the further paper samples Hoover tested did not arrive until 12/1, how could they have been tested for these 11/30 documents? Further, Bugliosi leaves out the fact that the FBI later offered two differing explanations for the differing documents. One by Public Affairs Officer William Baker, the other by the actual author of the documents Vincent Drain. They both offered differing but benign explanations. It turns out they were both wrong. It now appears that the bag in evidence did not match the Depository paper samples and that the document was later altered to say it did. (See Speer's article, "Proof the FBI Changed Documents and Vincent Bugliosi was Wrong," at the Mary Ferrell Foundation.)

This would indicate that the bag in evidence today was manufactured after the fact. Speer makes a cogent argument on his web site that this happened. He shows that the paper bag allegedly found in the Depository, carried outside and photographed by the press that day does not appear to be the same paper bag returned by the FBI to the Dallas Police four days later. The fascinating thing about his study is that it appears that not only did the Dallas Police not photograph the bag where they say they found it, but they do not appear to have photographed it at all until November 26th! This, of course, brings even further doubt on the aforementioned fingerprint evidence. The DPD did not lift or photograph any such evidence while they had the bag. And according to FBI agent Gordon Shanklin's inventory, the bag was not sent to Washington on the evening of the assassination. (The Third Decade, Vol. 1 No. 2, p. 12) Once it got there, the FBI had to do three different tests in order to pull off one index finger fingerprint and one palmprint. (WC Vol. IV pgs. 3-4) The bag then returned to Dallas, appears to be a different bag than the one sent. If so, how did the palmprint and index fingerprint get on it? In other words, which bag was the print evidence on?

As Speer notes, the Dallas Police could not tell a consistent story on what was discovered first, the bag or the rifle. They could not tell a consistent story on who dusted the bag. Lt. Day says he did this on the scene, but no one on the scene backs him on this, maybe because he came up with no prints. Others say it was Det. Studebaker who dusted the bag.

But it's even worse than that. The DPD can't even tell a coherent story as to who found the bag. Day said the bag was found near the shells. Yet when Luke Mooney described the discovery of the shells, he mentioned no bag. But, as Griggs points out, if Day was telling the truth, Mooney had to have been standing on the bag as he stood over the shells! (Ian Griggs, No Case to Answer, pgs. 176-77) When David Belin asked Deputy Sheriff Roger Craig if he saw any long sack laying in the floor, Craig replied that he did not. (ibid p. 178) Sgt. Gerald Hill said he didn't see the long sack even though he wasn't really asked the question. (ibid) In his obtuse answer, Hill referred to Det. Hicks. Yet when Hicks was asked if he saw a long paper sack he replied "No sir; I don't believe I did." (ibid p. 179) The police now relied on Detectives Johnson, Montgomery, and Studebaker to save the day. Listen to Montgomery: "Let's see—the paper sack—I don't recall for sure if it was on the floor or on the box, but I know it was just there—one of the pictures might show exactly where it was." (Meagher, p. 59) Of course, there was no picture. And we are to believe Montgomery didn't know that.

A further problem with Montgomery and Johnson was that although they allegedly saw such a bag, they couldn't decide who picked it up and unfolded it. Johnson said Montgomery picked it up and unfolded it. But Montgomery said nothing about unfolding it and firmly denied picking it up. (Griggs, pgs. 181-182) Montgomery passed that buck onto Studebaker. Studebaker is the man who photographed much of the evidence. But somehow, he did not photograph the bag in situ. Or even on the floor it was found. For he admitted the bag did not even show up incidentally in any related photos he took on the sixth floor. He also said he put a piece of tape on the bag where he thought he saw a possible print. There was no such visible print, or tape, on the bag when received by the FBI. (Meagher, p. 61) But here is the capper with Studebaker. When asked how long the bag was, he said it was between three and four feet long. (Griggs, p. 185) This is almost twice as long as the bag Frazier testified to. In other words, the man who should have seen the bag first did not, even though he was standing on it. And the man who did see it, and should have photographed it, did not take the picture. What makes it even worse is that it appears that it is this bag that was photographed outside the Depository by the press. Speer has some fun showing the difficulty in matching this package to the bag in evidence today.

In light of all the above, even Police Chief Jesse Curry had doubts about the paper bag. As Speer notes, in describing the bag in a picture, Curry wrote: "A paper bag probably constructed from wrapping paper and tape at the Texas School Book Depository.. .This is probably the same bag which was found on the sixth floor by investigators." (italics added) Here, the Police Chief—the man ultimately responsible for the case against Oswald—actually used the qualifier "probably" not once, but twice. Finally, Speer shows that the second bag, the one in evidence today, was very likely cut down in size from the Commission's larger bag, the one described by Studebaker. It had to be in order to fit the allegations of Wesley Frazier about a different bag. Which indicates just how important Frazier was to the official story in this regard.
Our future may lie beyond our vision, but it is not completely beyond our control. It is the shaping impulse of America that neither fate nor nature nor the irresistible tides of history, but the work of our own hands, matched to reason and principle, that will determine our destiny.

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Re: Phil Dragoo Commentaries and Images
« Reply #51 on: July 11, 2013, 02:02:52 PM »
The Assassination / "I'll put my guns in the ground"--B. Dylan

Kelly

You bring up an excellent point regarding Lee Oswald's alleged attempt on General Walker's life.

In addition to the astonishing claim that he, a Marine, would bury a rifle, a series of anomalies present to me:

It was after his murder that the Walker claim was made.

A credible witness saw not one but two men, and said they left in a car—Lee, we are told, could not drive.

General Walker said the bullet later shown was not the bullet recovered.

There is the fact the shooter had a target at rest at close range and missed--

--yet hundreds of feet below moving away at an angle this same shooter could make the shots unable to be matched by the Commission's experts.

Fiction is a wonderful medium.  E. Howard Hunt wrote 42 novels.  He was summoned by Allen Dulles to be the latter's personal consultant 1961-3.

And yet the author, even with his son's assistance, cannot write THE END.
Our future may lie beyond our vision, but it is not completely beyond our control. It is the shaping impulse of America that neither fate nor nature nor the irresistible tides of history, but the work of our own hands, matched to reason and principle, that will determine our destiny.

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Re: Phil Dragoo Commentaries and Images
« Reply #52 on: July 11, 2013, 02:03:28 PM »
The Assassination / Walker stalker? No more than sniper or copkiller

Kelly

Again and again we must rely on the post-mortem account of Marina the coached and extorted hostage of U.S. intelligence.

Leo Sauvage in 1965 spoke to the problems with the Walker allegation specifically in these three paragraphs:

The Warren Commission’s Case Against Oswald
By Leo Sauvage
The New Leader, 22 November 1965, pages 16–21



As for proof number 7, again space limitations prevent full exploration of the charge that Oswald attempted to assassinate General Walker. Suffice to say that the accusation rests essentially on the “revelations” of Marina Oswald—whom everyone need not regard with the same confident admiration as does Justice Warren. Besides, her testimony is contradicted by a mountain of improbabilities: the circumstances under which Oswald would have been able to go to Walker’s house and back, the identification of the recovered bullet, the simple fact that the sharpshooter of Elm Street is supposed to have missed an extremely easy target and, curiously, did not immediately fire a second shot. All that matters here, however, is the way the Commission tries to link the attack on Walker with the President’s assassination.

    The idea, apparently, is that the attempt on Walker demonstrates Oswald’s “disposition to take human life” and “his capacity for violence.” This is summed up in Chapter VII of the Report, where “possible motives” of Oswald are discussed, in a striking sentence that is in itself sufficient to destroy proof number 7: “The Commission has concluded that on April 10, 1963, Oswald shot at Maj. General Edwin A. Walker (Resigned, U.S. Army), demonstrating once again his propensity to act dramatically and, in this instance, violently, in furtherance of his beliefs.”


    In furtherance of which beliefs is Oswald supposed to have slain Kennedy? The Report gives us the following details: “Oswald did not lack the determination and other traits required to carry out a carefully planned killing of another human being and was willing to consummate such a purpose if he thought there was sufficient reason to do so. Some idea of what he thought was sufficient reason for such an act may be found in the nature of the motive that he stated for his attack on General Walker. Marina Oswald indicated that her husband had compared General Walker to Adolph [sic] Hitler…” Granting for now, as does Chief Justice Warren, that the word of Marina Oswald is sacred—did Oswald consider John Kennedy to be another Hitler or another Walker? Oswald’s various statements about Kennedy, cited by the Report, categorically disprove this interpretation; yet in the conclusion to Chapter VII the Commission coolly repeats that Oswald demonstrated “a capacity to act decisively and without regard to the consequences when such action would further his aims of the moment.” Since one searches in vain, from start to finish of the Warren Report, for a single word on the “aims of the moment” Oswald believed he would serve by killing Kennedy, the Commission—to the extent that it beings up the attempt on Walker—seems to prove, if anything, that Oswald could not have been the assassin of President Kennedy.

~

It is always presented as circular logic: that Oswald killed the president because he killed the policeman—yet neither has been proved.

--that Oswald killed the president and killed the policeman because he tried to kill General Walker—and this, too, has not been proved.

In Arthur Conan Doyle's The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes, the Adventure of the Three Garridebs, on page 122 Holmes sums up for Watson the stranger who has just departed their apartment:

“Touch him where you would he was false.”

So it is with the myth of Oswald the man without motive, means or opportunity.  Through his murder, in the absence of the test of the adversarial trial, cross examination, and the rules of evidence, a demon materializes on the cover of C.D. Jackson's Life magazine.
Our future may lie beyond our vision, but it is not completely beyond our control. It is the shaping impulse of America that neither fate nor nature nor the irresistible tides of history, but the work of our own hands, matched to reason and principle, that will determine our destiny.

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Re: Phil Dragoo Commentaries and Images
« Reply #53 on: July 11, 2013, 02:03:59 PM »
The Assassination / Variable calibers, vigilantes in the mist

JFKIndependent&Free

As you note, in the case of the shot at Walker, a 30.06:

From the third printing of James Douglass, JFK and the Unspeakable, page 470, notes for Chapter 6: Washington and Dallas:

675.  On the authority of Dallas Police detective Ira Van Cleave, the New York Times reported that the bullet fired into the wall behind General Edwin Walker on April 10, 1963, was “from a 30.06 rifle.”  “Walker Escapes Assassin's Bullet, “ New York Times (April 12, 1963), p. 12.  However, as in the case of much assassination-related evidence, the bullet was transformed while in the custody of the FBI.  An FBI ballistics expert identified it instead as “a 6.5 millimeter bullet,” thus making it compatible with Oswald's rifle, which the Warren Commission then ruled was its source.  Warren Report, pp. 186-87.  Under pressure from federal investigators, Marina Oswald gave a series of totally contradictory statements on her husband's involvement in the Walker incident, which the Warren Commission drew on selectively to accuse Oswald of shooting at Walker (used in turn as evidence of his capacity to kill Kennedy).  After examining the same questionable testimony, the House Select Committee on Assassinations concluded: “we regretfully refuse to accept the judgment of the (Warren) Commission in regard to the Walker shooting.”  HSCA synopsis of Marina Oswald Porter testimony.  Cited by Armstrong, Harvey & Lee, p. 520.

~

Kelly

George DeMohrenschildt was requested by J. Walton Moore of the CIA Domestic Contacts Division to guide Oswald in Dallas.  DeMohrenschildt introduced Lee and Marina to Ruth Paine (whose sister was a CIA agent, and whose family had links to Allen Dulles and Bell Helicopter).

Ruth Paine placed Lee Oswald in the Texas School Book Depository.  Next to the Dal-Tex Building where Jeanne DeMohrenschildt's business partner Abraham Zapruder had his Jenifer Juniors business.

DeMohrenschildt begged former DCI George H.W. Bush to call off the “vigilantes.”  After injections and disturbing treatments by a Dr. Mendoza, DeMohrenschildt left Angleton's asset Epstein and, before HSCA investigator Fonzi could call upon him, died under suspicious circumstances on March 29, 1977.

Which was the same day Charles “Chuck” Nicoletti, associate of Giancana, Traficante, Rosselli and Marcello, was shot dead in a hail of bullets.

George Michael Evica, A Certain Arrogance, examines Allen Dulles' decades of manipulations of Unitarian contacts (the Paines were Unitarians), and White Russians such as DeMohrenschildt's circle.
Our future may lie beyond our vision, but it is not completely beyond our control. It is the shaping impulse of America that neither fate nor nature nor the irresistible tides of history, but the work of our own hands, matched to reason and principle, that will determine our destiny.

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Re: Phil Dragoo Commentaries and Images
« Reply #54 on: July 11, 2013, 02:04:58 PM »
The Assassination / Ray Bolger played a straw man

Legions of strawmen in close-order drill:


“Mark Lane is not an honest person”--




Richard Helms, a former CIA director who lied under oath to Congress


“Oswald was not in the CIA”--

No CIA membership card was found in any of Oswald's three wallets.

E. Howard Hunt—CIA--had an alibi for November 22, 1963.

Along came Mark Lane.

Not to be confused with John Newman, who also never said Oswald was in CIA:

http://www.ctka.net/reviews/newman.html


Oswald and the CIA, by John Newman
Reviewed by James DiEugenio

~

http://www.ctka.net/pr700-ang.html

James Jesus Angleton
and the Kennedy Assassination
By Lisa Pease
Who does not say Oswald was in CIA
~

http://www.ctka.net/pr900-ang.html
James Jesus Angleton
and the Kennedy Assassination, Part II

By Lisa Pease
Who does not say CIA killed Kennedy

~
Our friend from Army intelligence told us, “You know Mark Lane was a Communist, don't you.”

Why, I had no idea.

We were told Oswald was a Communist—but he was never seen in the company of any Communists.

He must have had a card—perhaps in his fourth wallet.

What we do know at this hour is that outgoing SecDef and former Director of Central Intelligence Robert M. Gates told Senator Patrick Leahy, “Governments lie to each other—it's how business gets done.”

It's how Robert Blakey and the HSCA shielded the CIA, Mr. Gates—but you know that.

Our future may lie beyond our vision, but it is not completely beyond our control. It is the shaping impulse of America that neither fate nor nature nor the irresistible tides of history, but the work of our own hands, matched to reason and principle, that will determine our destiny.

RFK

Alan Dale

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Re: Phil Dragoo Commentaries and Images
« Reply #55 on: July 11, 2013, 02:05:41 PM »

The Assassination / Sound effects & the unexpected

 
The following people heard only one shot before the flurry, which occurred at the time the head exploded:
Jack Bell (AP):
"in quick succession" (NYT 11/23/63, p.5)
George Hickey:
"in rapid succession...no time element between" (18H762)
Roy Kellerman:
"flurry...plane breaking the sound barrier...bang, bang"; (2H76)
Clinton Hill:
"The second shot had "an echo...double sound" (2H144)
Mary Woodward:
"The second two shots were immediate...as if one were an echo of the other... with the second and third shot...I saw the head explode" (A&E,II )
Will Greer:
"simultaneously" (2H118)
Glenn Bennett:
"A second shot followed immediately and hit the right rear high of the President's head." (18H760)
Rufus Youngblood:
"in rapid succession." Rufus Youngblood (Robert MacNeil's The Way We Were, 1988, Carroll & Graf)
Warren Taylor:
"in the instant that my left foot touched the ground, I heard two more bangs" (CE1024)
Seymour Weitzman:
"simultaneous" (7H106)
Linda Kay Wills:
"two real fast bullets together" (7H498)
Lee Bowers:
Rapped his knuckles on a table showing the near simultaneity of the last two. (Mark Lane 1966 Tape)
Junior Jarman:
"third shot was fired right behind the second" (3H204)
Carolyn Walther:
"almost at the same time" (C.E.2086)
Toney Henderson:
"in rapid succession" (C.E.208)
Mrs. Lyndon Johnson:
"in rapid succession." (H565)
http://www.ctka.net/pr1195-cranor.html

See also 51 Witnesses by Harold Feldman

http://www.acorn.net/jfkplace/09/fp.back_issues/12th_Issue/51_wits.html

Unsuppressed Rifle vs. Suppressed Rifle

Unsuppressed Rifle vs. Suppressed Rifle
Our future may lie beyond our vision, but it is not completely beyond our control. It is the shaping impulse of America that neither fate nor nature nor the irresistible tides of history, but the work of our own hands, matched to reason and principle, that will determine our destiny.

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Re: Phil Dragoo Commentaries and Images
« Reply #56 on: July 11, 2013, 02:06:24 PM »

The Assassination / Realpolitik

JFKIF

Tens of thousands of people went to watch the president pass, most to cheer, only a few to glare, only a handful to shoot.

There were no newspaper announcements of an assassination, no tweets, no texts, no emails.

Firecrackers recurs in eyewitness accounts.

An announcer is stunned, "It appears something has happened."

American Mercenaries: The True Story of Mitch WerBell Part 1 - Video
Our future may lie beyond our vision, but it is not completely beyond our control. It is the shaping impulse of America that neither fate nor nature nor the irresistible tides of history, but the work of our own hands, matched to reason and principle, that will determine our destiny.

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Re: Phil Dragoo Commentaries and Images
« Reply #57 on: July 11, 2013, 02:07:03 PM »
The Assassination / Shot heard round the world. Or not.

Cutty

Your excellent link yielded four primary principles pertinent for the Dealey sniper:

1) The assembled suppressed weapon is a unit not to be disassembled in order to maintain its zero;

2) An improperly machined, assembled or aligned suppressor will cause shots to stray;

3) A barrel need not be longer to be more accurate, in fact, a shorter barrel with better maching is more accurate;

4) A subsonic shot is able to be suppressed to the point of virtual undetectability:

The relevant excerpts are these:


A suppressed rifle should be stored and carried in its assembled, ready-to-go configuration. Many of us have seen movies in which a fitted case full of components (stock, action, barrel, forearm, scope, mount and silencer) was assembled in the field, and then used to complete an important assassination. This is pure Hollywood. No enforcement officer in his right mind would ever assemble a rifle on the spot on a callout at a crime scene and expect the weapon to hold its zero. (1)   It might, but such an occurrence would be an abnormality. And what would he the moral and legal consequences of a botched shot in a hostage rescue attempt? By the same token, some suppressors cause shots to stray with various degrees of tightness or looseness on a rifle's barrel. (2)

~

We have been taught from grade school that long barrels are much more accurate than short barrels, but this has no basis in fact. (3) We personally find that an 46 cm or 18 inch barrel is a bit more accurate than a 66 cm or 26 inch barrel. The chamber, throat, crown and rifling are more important than barrel length. Subsonic rifle barrels may range from 20 to 30 cm or 8 to 12 inches in length. One does not need very much linear acceleration in order to reach a velocity of 300 m/s or 1,000 fps with a .308 bullet.

~

With a properly designed system, the loudest sound will be that of the bullet strike. With effective suppressor technology we can all but eliminate the sound of a muzzle blast. By hovering around 1,000 fps we can virtually eliminate bullet flight noise. (4) The only thing left is the plop of bullet impact, which can be quite loud on occasion.

~

One doesn't need much barrel length to develop a minimal 300 m/s or 1,000 fps of velocity with a heavy, large caliber bullet. A 20 to 25 cm or 8 to 10 inch tube will provide plenty of acceleration. For the record, a good 25 cm or 10 inch barrel is fully as accurate as a much longer one. One more time, with feeling, a 25 cm or 10 inch barrel is fully as accurate as a 76 cm or 30 inch barrel. We often note a significant increase in accuracy when we cut a 61 cm or 24 inch barrel back to 25 cm or 10 inches. A proper chamber, adequate rifling twist rate and a perfect muzzle crown are all more important than barrel length. (3)

~


In Robert's essays on the shots from the Dal-Tex Building which hit the pavement, the possibility presents that their innaccuracy was due to a suppressor field-installed without regard to the extant author's exhortation to maintain assembly of a dedicated suppressed sniper weapon.

The riddle of the backshot's penetration to a ridiculously shallow depth may be due to a short load intended to reduce velocity and hence sound, or to a mis-machined, -assembled, or -aligned suppressor causing tumbling and subsequent innaccuracy.

The use of shorter-barreled weapons is not constrained by the demands of accuracy, allowing for at least one eye-witness' observance of such a weapon.

The publicized fact that subsonic shots may be suppressed below the level of detection allows for shots not mentioned by any set of witnesses assembled by FBI, Warren Report, HSCA records, various researchers or interviewers.

This allows for a greater liberality in assignment of shots to account for back shot, throat shot, two headshots, shots to Connally, shots to the pavement at the turn, a shot on the sidewalk, a shot near a manhole, a shot in the grass picked up and pocketed by a man in a suit, a shot striking the curb at the feet of James Tague.

Noel Twyman interviewed Gerry Hemming for Bloody Treason:

Gerry Patrick Hemming states: “The one thing we do know is none of the [assassination] teams knew the existence of the others ... when they heard the shots, they would flinch because they weren’t sure that they’d been spotted and somebody was trying to take them out. ... you can put a smile on the shooter’s face because then he realizes that it’s a super-pro job and there are backup and decoy teams and that’s where those shots are coming from. Silencers were used extensively. These were sonic silencers purchased through Mitchell Werbell.” BT

http://www.assassinationresearch.com/v2n1/chrono2.pdf

Deputy Weatherford:

Deputy Sheriff and crack shot Harry Weatherford is on the roof of the Dallas County Jail (Records Building) with a rifle during the assas­sination. Weatherford has received a custom-made silencer for his rifle several weeks prior to the assassination. He is reportedly ordered to the roof of the building by Dallas sheriff Bill Decker. (When Decker dies in 1970, Weatherford is at his bedside.) A researcher once asks him if he shot JFK. Weatherford replies, “You little son of a bitch, I shoot lots of people.”
http://books.google.com/books?id=4YovjRf2NYQC&pg=PA472&lpg=PA472&dq=dallas+sheriff's+deputy+weatherford+rifle+silencer+I+shoot+lots+of+people&source=bl&ots=xh1YKvhdmd&sig=59osFgGmtOUfXkrv5MjN-5aKF-s&hl=en&ei=6oFDTtuwHI2BsgLyyuXcCQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CBwQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false
Our future may lie beyond our vision, but it is not completely beyond our control. It is the shaping impulse of America that neither fate nor nature nor the irresistible tides of history, but the work of our own hands, matched to reason and principle, that will determine our destiny.

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Re: Phil Dragoo Commentaries and Images
« Reply #58 on: July 11, 2013, 02:07:44 PM »
The Assassination / Hunt, Buckley, fictions, footnotes

Buckley is a quibbler, has no intention of listening, let alone hearing, let alone allowing to be heard any argument counter to dogma, that is, Oswald.

He wrote the Sharon Statement in 1960, the founding document of Young Americans for Freedom, the group which met in New York in 1964 in an effort to draft Goldwater.

Buckley in his observance of the passing of E. Howard Hunt is beyond scrupulous in limiting his acquaintance to Mexico City CIA employment 1950-1, eschewing any but the most cursory assistance post-Watergate.

Buckley's another of those who left the Agency.  And on that mockery you will not hear a laugh except outside the Gates of Eden.

As the O'Brien in the grilling—and it's no interview; it's a roast—Buckley concedes nothing and sees no merit.

And isn't it special that Buckley throws up Robert Kennedy, the president's brother, the Attorney General, accepts the Warren Report, if it's good enough for him, it's good enough for me.

Lane says, but Robert Kennedy has not read the 26 volumes of evidence and is not an expert, and you do not accept the word of Robert Kennedy on other things.

Buckley says it's prescriptive, that he doesn't have to prove the earth is round.  Lane says that is not in contention; the death of President Kennedy is.

It's merely jousting.  In the end Buckley the intellectual accepts the coarsest of lies, that a lone Communist killed the president.

Return to the key, the slanderous introduction, the reptilian hiss that Lane is a leftist embracing leftist causes, and when Lane objected the lizard's tongue darts out sampling the air.

It's as much a show as the wonderful match with Gore Vidal wherein Vidal's smear of Buckley as a Nazi is met with the cool threat of plastering the guest.

Key here is Vidal's 1973 Review of Books work The Art and Arts of E. Howard Hunt wherein it is posited Hunt forged cables blaming JFK for Diem's murder, that Hunt forged the Bremer diary, Bremer being crucial to Nixon's re-election.

And as for Nixon's 1968 triumph, Buckley on the occasion of Hunt's death explained his horror at the latter's suggestion LBJ had been involved in the assassination of JFK.  And does not Buckley's assurance to the author of Rush to Judgment that Robert Kennedy's opinion was good enough for the arch-conservative ring particularly hollow in the light (or darkness) of the Ambassador pantry?

Buckley worked for Hunt; Dulles called in Hunt for a project occupying the years 1961-3.  And Hunt would be the saboteur to take down Nixon.

Buckley left the Agency, but his conclusions regarding Dallas remained those of the men who kept the secrets forty years on, the lone Communist.

Our friend the veteran of Army intelligence spat out in disgust that Mark Lane was a Communist.

Oswald the Communist.  Lane the Communist.  We are speaking in code here.

This is a category beyond the protections of law or civilization.  As James Douglass characterized John Kennedy, he was soon marked out for assassination.

Bowers saw three cars; two out of three with Goldwater stickers.  Buckley was telling Lane at the last that it didn't matter who killed the president, that it did matter that the president was killed.

Oh, to be sure.
Our future may lie beyond our vision, but it is not completely beyond our control. It is the shaping impulse of America that neither fate nor nature nor the irresistible tides of history, but the work of our own hands, matched to reason and principle, that will determine our destiny.

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Re: Phil Dragoo Commentaries and Images
« Reply #59 on: July 11, 2013, 02:09:07 PM »
The Assassination / Revising. . . .please wait.


(O)n November 23, 1963 Deputy Constable Seymour Weitzman executed an affidavit. He swore that on the previous day he discovered on the sixth floor of the Depository a 7.65 Mauser equipped with a 4/18 scope, and a thick leather brownish-black sling on it. (The actual affidavit is in Mark Lane's Rush To Judgment, p. 409) This is not what the Commission later said was Oswald's rifle. They said it was a 6.5 Mannlicher Carcano. But further, Deputy Sheriff Roger Craig was standing near Weitzman at the time of discovery. He said that Weitzman thought it was a Mauser at first. But then he looked at the rifle at close range and saw that it was stamped "7. 65 Mauser". This is what confirmed the ID for the constable. (This testimony can be seen in the film Evidence of Revision on You Tube, Part IV.)

http://www.ctka.net/2009/target_car_jd.html

~

http://jfk.hood.edu/Collection/Weisberg%20Subject%20Index%20Files/O%20Disk/O'Toole%20George/Item%2003.pdf


Deputy constable Seymour Weitzman of the Dallas police claimed that he found Oswald's Mannlicher-Carcano on the sixth floor of the Texas School Book Depository.  However, on the day of the assassination he had told the press that the rifle he'd found was a German Mauser.  The following day he signed an affidavit to that effect.  But on the CBS tapes he testified that he'd been mistaken about that point, that it had really been Oswald's rifle.  The PSE showed considerable stress in his statements.  (pages 6-7)

~

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/JFKSmannlicher.htm


A group of Dallas Police Department detectives, including Will Fritz, Seymour Weitzman, Roger Craig, Eugene Boone and Luke Mooney searched the Texas School Book Depository soon after the assassination of John F. Kennedy. On the sixth floor they discovered a rifle hidden beneath some boxes. The detectives identified it as a 7.65 Mauser. District Attorney Henry M. Wade, in a television interview, told the nation that the rifle was a Mauser. It was the FBI who announced that the officers had been mistaken. According to them it was a 6.5 Mannlicher-Carcano, an Italian bolt-action rifle used in the Second World War. All the detectives agreed to change their mind about the rifle except Roger Craig.


On page 263 of James Douglass, JFK and the Unspeakable: Why He Died and Why It Matters:

Deputy Constable Seymour Weitzman who told the Warren Commission he met up with Secret Service agents behind the wall that adjoined the stockade fence, said he turned over “to one of the Secret Service men” what he believed was a portion of the president's skull that he had found on Elm Street.

Of course the “Secret Service agents” were nothing of the sort.

One such imposter would later be identified as Bernard Barker:

http://www.crimemagazine.com/gerald-fords-role-jfk-assassination-cover


Dallas County deputy constable Seymour Weitzman also ran toward the top of the grassy knoll – where he found a man carrying Secret Service identification. Weitzman later identified this man as Bernard Barker, a CIA asset and the future Watergate burglar who would lead the four-man contingent of Cuban–born Watergate burglars from the Miami area. Barker was an expert at surreptitious entries, planting bugs and photographing documents. He was a close associate of Florida Mafia godfather Santos Trafficante, and of Mob-connected Key Biscayne banker Bebe Rebozo – Richard Nixon's bosom buddy.
Our future may lie beyond our vision, but it is not completely beyond our control. It is the shaping impulse of America that neither fate nor nature nor the irresistible tides of history, but the work of our own hands, matched to reason and principle, that will determine our destiny.

RFK